#AIFINCoE Helsinki, Finlandia Hall, 26-27 February 2019


With the emergence of new tools that employ artificial intelligence (AI) we are witnessing another technological revolution. It affects individuals, communities and institutions at multiple, interconnected and interdependent levels. The impacts of AI are everywhere and present opportunities as well as important challenges for the lives and futures of billions of people.

The overall aim of the Conference is to engage in a critical, open and inclusive discussion on how to address AI development to maximise benefits for society and minimise risks to human rights, democracy and the rule of law. The conference will bring together high-level experts from governments, international organisations, businesses, technology, academia and research, civil society and the media. From the perspective of the Council of Europe’s core mandate and values, the debates will explore ways to ensure that emerging technologies are designed, developed and applied to create value for individuals, for democratic societies and for the viability of legal and institutional frameworks. Read more

International Conference on Peace Education and Peace Studies

Barcelona, Spain
March 6 – 7, 2020

ICPEPS 2020: International Conference on Peace Education and Peace Studies aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Peace Education and Peace Studies. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Peace Education and Peace Studies. Read more

7 female activists under 23 who are changing the world

Whether it’s leading a national conversation about gun control or fighting for girls’ education and gender equality around the world, an increasing number of young women are stepping forward as change agents.

To keep the momentum going, this year’s theme for International Women’s Day is centered around #PressforProgress and urges women of all generations to to use their voices to make a difference. Read more

INTERNATIONAL PEACE CONFERENCE 2019: SAPERE AUDE (DARE TO KNOW)


The fifth annual International Peace Conference is fast approaching and will be taking place from Feb 1st-3rd  in Maastricht, Netherlands 
​Explore and learn more about the conference and our upcoming theme: “Sapere Aude”

During a three-day conference, 400 participants of over 105 nationalities, take part in a wide variety of engagements. Workshops led by youth, who have either experienced the absence of peace or with personal ties to various forms of conflict, offer unique insights and solution-based discussions. Peacemakers, challengers, advocates, and experts from around the world share their knowledge and inspire through lectures and leaded debates. Read more

Paris Peace Conference, 1919

The =&0=&, also known as =&1=&, was the meeting of the victorious Allied Powers following the end of World War I to set the peace terms for the defeated Central Powers.

Involving diplomats from 32 countries and nationalities, the major or main decisions were the creation of the League of Nations, as well as the five peace treaties with the defeated states; the awarding of German and Ottoman overseas possessions as “mandates”, chiefly to Britain and France; reparations imposed on Germany; and the drawing of new national boundaries (sometimes with plebiscites) to better reflect ethnic boundaries.

The main result was the Treaty of Versailles with Germany, which in section 231 laid the guilt for the war on “the aggression of Germany and her allies”. This provision proved humiliating for Germany and set the stage for the expensive reparations Germany was intended to pay (it paid only a small portion before reparations ended in 1931). The five major powers (France, Britain, Italy, Japan and the United States) controlled the Conference. And the “Big Four” were the Prime Minister of France, Georges Clemenceau; the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, David Lloyd George; the President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson; and the Prime Minister of Italy, Vittorio Emanuele Orlando. They met together informally 145 times and made all the major decisions, which in turn were ratified by the others.

The Conference opened on 18 January 1919. This date was symbolic, as it was the anniversary of the proclamation of William I as German Emperor in 1871, in the Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles, shortly before the end of the Siege of Paris – a day itself imbued with significance in its turn in Germany as the anniversary of the establishment of the Kingdom of Prussia in 1701. The Delegates from 27 nations (delegates representing 5 nationalities were for the most part ignored) were assigned to 52 commissions, which held 1,646 sessions to prepare reports, with the help of many experts, on topics ranging from prisoners of war to undersea cables, to international aviation, to responsibility for the war. Key recommendations were folded into the Treaty of Versailles with Germany, which had 15 chapters and 440 clauses, as well as treaties for the other defeated nations.

The five major powers (France, Britain, Italy, the U.S., and Japan) controlled the Conference. Amongst the “Big Five”, in practice Japan only sent a former prime minister and played a small role; and the “Big Four” leaders dominated the conference. The four met together informally 145 times and made all the major decisions, which in turn were ratified by other attendees. The open meetings of all the delegations approved the decisions made by the Big Four. The conference came to an end on 21 January 1920 with the inaugural General Assembly of the League of Nations.

Youth Peace Camp 2018

The Youth Peace Camps were initiated by the Council of Europe in 2003, in cooperation with   Europa Park in Rust, Germany, to bring together young people from conflict regions and to support them in initiating dialogue and cooperation.

In the past years the peace camp project brought together young people from the Middle East, Southeast and Eastern Europe. During the camp the participants followed an experiential learning process and acquired competences in the fields of intercultural learning, dialogue and conflict transformation, within a human rights framework.

Aim

The Youth Peace Camp engages young people and youth organisations from conflict affected regions in dialogue and conflict transformation activities based on human rights education and intercultural learning during and after the camp.

Objectives:  

The main objectives (personal, organisational and institutional) of the Youth Peace Camp are:

  • To develop awareness and basic competences (knowledge, skills and attitudes) of participants in human rights education, conflict transformation, intercultural learning and dialogue, including a critical understanding of personal and collective identities and their role in conflicts
  • To enable participants to share personal experiences of conflict and violence and coping strategies in a positive and safe atmosphere of living and learning together
  • To motivate and support participants in their role as multipliers and peer leaders in peace-building activities with young people encouraging them to implement follow-up initiatives
  • To promote and share existing youth work practices and experiences of young people working on dialogue and conflict transformation in their home communities
  • To strengthen the role of the Council of Europe, in particular through its Youth for Democracy programme, in its efforts towards strengthening youth work in the field of conflict transformation, social cohesion and intercultural dialogue and in the implementation of the approaches of the UN Security Council Resolution 2250 (2015) on Youth, Peace and Security.
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