Minority Rights Group

Minority Rights Group International campaigns worldwide with around 130 partners in over 60 countries to ensure that disadvantaged minorities and indigenous peoples, often the poorest of the poor, can make their voices heard.

Through training and educationlegal casespublications and the media and cultural programmes we support minority and indigenous people as they strive to maintain their rights – to the land they live on, the languages they speak, to equal opportunities in education and employment, and to full participation in public life. Read more

These Twins Will Make You Rethink Race

WHEN AMANDA WANKLIN and Michael Biggs fell in love, they “didn’t give a toss” about the challenges they might face as a biracial couple, Amanda says. “What was more important was what we wanted together.”

They settled down in Birmingham, England, eager to start a family. On July 3, 2006, Amanda gave birth to fraternal twin girls, and the ecstatic parents gave their daughters intertwined names: One would be Millie Marcia Madge Biggs, the other Marcia Millie Madge Biggs. Read more

International Youth Day 2018

Youth need safe spaces where they can come together, engage in activities related to their diverse needs and interests, participate in decision making processes and freely express themselves. While there are many types of spaces, safe spaces ensure the dignity and safety of youth.  Safe spaces such as civic spaces enable youth to engage in governance issues; public spaces afford youth the opportunity to participate in sports and other leisure activities in the community; digital spaces help youth interact virtually across borders with everyone; and well planned physical spaces can help accommodate the needs of diverse youth especially those vulnerable to marginalization or violence. Read more

CALL FOR THE PROPOSALS

Divided Past – Joint Future” is the project implemented by a consortium of 18 partners (7 IPA beneficiary countries plus Slovenia, Croatia, Austria and Netherland). Project consortium involves CSOs, research institutes, foundations, resources centres and Erasmus NAs and 13 associated business partners. Duration of the project is 48 months (starting date 1stJanuary 2016). Read more

Internet Safety Guide for Women

Have you ever been harassed in the street? Received a crass message on a dating app? Had a coworker make a comment about your appearance that just didn’t sit right?

You’re not alone.

With the #MeToo movement, it’s easy to log onto Twitter or Facebook and see just how many women are victims of sexual harassment. Whether in person or online, women everywhere have experienced it in one way or another. And with all the new ways the internet has opened avenues of communication, online harassment is more prevalent than ever. Read more

UN Dialogue for the Future

On the basis of a joint initiative of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) and the Secretary General of the United Nations (UN), as well as a recognized need to create space for dialogue and promotion of coexistence in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the UN Team in BiH, under the leadership of the Resident Coordinator of the UN, in cooperation with the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina have developed a project called “Dialogue for the Future: The promotion of coexistence and diversity in Bosnia and Herzegovina”, which is jointly implemented by UN agencies UNESCO, UNICEF and UNDP. Read more

Peace Sign interpreted differently

Certain gestures that are innocent in Europe or USA, mean something completely different (and offensive) overseas.

Peace Sign With Palm Facing Inward

Trying to order two beers from the bartender or wish someone peace in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, or New Zealand? Make sure that when you have your index and middle fingers pointed up in the V shape, your palm is facing outward. Otherwise, you’re giving the equivalent of the middle finger. Read more

Paris Peace Conference, 1919

The Paris Peace Conference, also known as Versailles Peace Conference, was the meeting of the victorious Allied Powers following the end of World War I to set the peace terms for the defeated Central Powers.

Involving diplomats from 32 countries and nationalities, the major or main decisions were the creation of the League of Nations, as well as the five peace treaties with the defeated states; the awarding of German and Ottoman overseas possessions as “mandates”, chiefly to Britain and France; reparations imposed on Germany; and the drawing of new national boundaries (sometimes with plebiscites) to better reflect ethnic boundaries. Read more